Dressed to impress.

Elizabeth Turney2

Elizabeth Turney sent us this picture of her mother Elizabeth Lang. The picture is taken on Quarry Street on what looks like a nice sunny day.

Elizabeth told us, my mother on the right hand side, with sister in law and niece. The guy on the left is her first husband Frank or Francis Wilson, Professional footballer.

Do you have any old family pictures that you would like to share? Send them to us and we will host them on our website for all to see.

MALCOLM STEWART 1823-1893.

MALCOLM STEWART 1823-1893.
Malcolm Stewart Death Card.
 
Janalee Bachand recently inherited a box of letters which included her 3-x great grandfather’s funeral notice card and she decided to get in touch with Historic Hamilton. Apart from what she has in the box she knows very little about her ancestry, so I decided to have a look for her. Janalee, here’s what I found.
 
I started my research with Malcolm and found that he was born on the 12th of January 1823 at Old Monklands which is now called Coatbridge. His parents were called Gilbert Stewart & Mary Johnston. He was baptised seven days after his birth on the 19th of January 1823, also at Old Monklands.
The first document that I find is on the 1841 census where Malcolm is living at a place called Chapelhall which used to be part of the Bothwell parish, now in North Lanarkshire. He was living with his parents and siblings. He is working as a coal miner at the age of 15.
 
He married your 3-x great grandmother on the 4th of January 1846 at Bothwell and her name was Margaret Stevenson Thomson. Margaret was the daughter of Robert Thomson & Jean Napier.
 
Malcolm & Margaret next appear on the 1851 census where they are living on Bo’Ness Road at Chapelhall and he is still working as a coal miner. Now I have to say that working as a coal miner was not a very well-paid job and most men who worked down in the pits struggled to feed their families.
The coal mines were very dangerous, and men & boys were often killed while at work, so I found it surprising when I next looked at the 1861 census and found that Malcolm had managed to change career and was now working as a butcher.
 
Within ten years, he had worked his way out of poverty and now had this fantastic job that would have allowed him to properly feed his family, in fact, he had quite a large family which I will tell you about soon. I have also never come across a man who has worked his way from being a coal miner and is now a pillar of the community which everyone would have known, so this for me is quite unusual.
 
So, Malcolm & Margaret had 13 children between them who were named:
Jane, 1846-1872. Gilbert, 1849-1938. Robert, 1850-1891. Mary, 1852-1883. Alexander, 1854-1883. Margaret, 1856-1931. Malcolm, 1858-1890. John, 1861-1942. David, 1863-1945. William, 1865-1954. Elizabeth, 1969-1941. Jane, 1873 & Malcolm 1877. Sadly, Malcolm & Margaret outlived five of their kids.
 
In 1881 the family were living at Docherty’s Buildings on Low Blantyre Road where he was now retired. The family then moved down to Burnbank and in 1891 they lived at Enfield Place; this block of tenements was part of the old Burnbank Cross.
 
When Malcolm retired, his sons took over the family business and staying in 1891 Robert was in charge of the shop and his brothers Gilbert, John, William & Malcolm were his assistants. I would imagine that the shop was doing pretty well to be employing so many of the family.
Malcolm Stewart Death
 
So, as you know Malcolm died on the 8th of March 1893. He died of a stroke and his son Gilbert registered his father’s death and took care of the funeral arrangements.
 
Janalee, your funeral card indicates that your 3-X Great grandfather was buried at the Holytown Churchyard. This is quite far out from Burnbank where he lived in his later years and I can’t give you an answer as to why he was buried here but it is very possible that his dad, Your 4-X Great Grandfather is buried at the churchyard. Perhaps there was a family plot here, or as this was where he lived in his younger years, then he may have felt that this place was home for him.
 
Janalee, if you do decide to research your family history, then let me know if you come across any pictures of your family and thanks for getting in touch with me at Historic Hamilton.
 
Garry,

The Ranche holiday club 23rd July 1927.

The Ranch holiday club. WM. Picture courtesy of Cat Ann Burns.

One thing that I often find hard is for people to look out their old photographs to share on Historic Hamilton. There must be thousands of pictures all across the world tucked away in albums, drawers up the loft etc.

Cat Ann Burns has sent us this real snap shot in time and in the picture are Hamilton men who were the local clientele in 1927.

The lads must have been saving for this holiday for a long time as they took time to make a plaque and pose for this picture. They are all extremely well dressed in their suits and dressed to impress.

Do you have any old pictures that you can share with us? if you can, then please send your picture to the page or by email at: HistoricHamilton@icloud.com

The Seagrave family.

The Seagrave family.
Celeste Landeros contacted us to see if we could assist with her family research. Celeste said:
 
“Hello Garry, I’m so excited to find your FB and website, historic Hamilton. I am planning a family heritage trip to Scotland this summer and have been researching our family’s past in preparation. My grandmother, Bridget “Betty” Seagrave was born in Burnbank in 1911 and immigrated to Scotland by herself in 1929.
 
We have very little information about her father, William C. Seagrave and her mother, Ellen Hall. There is a William Seagrave, age 25, in the 1901 census, living with the London family in the Albert Buildings. He is listed as a “pit worker,” presumably with Earnock. After that nothing. My grandmother’s marriage registry lists her father as having been born in Armah, Ireland.
 
My great grandmother, Ellen Hall, was born in Glasgow and the 1871 census lists her as living with her parents, both from Armah, on the notorious Muse Lane, that was “cleared” around that time. Her parents immigrated to Philadelphia but appear to have left her behind at age 2. She next shows up in the 1891 voter rolls in Glasgow, living on Whitevale — where I understand there was lodging for young ladies. How did she end up in Burnbank? How long did she live there? How did she meet William Seagrave? When did she pass away?”
 
Celeste, I see from what you have gathered during your research that you have got most of your family documented. The small questions of ‘How’ & ‘Why’ can sometimes never be answered but through extensive research the clues that you stumble across sometimes point you in the right direction to help find your answer. Did you know that today there are still members of the Seagrave family who live in Hamilton and they may be descendants of your great grandfather?
Seagrave
 
I will try to fill in some blanks for you and I started with your great grandfather William C Seagrave. I found that he died 21st of October 1948 and when he died, he was 76 years old. He died at 41 Bothwell Road in Hamilton and this may tell us that the family were not in any kind of financial position to pay for a doctor. 41 Bothwell Road was the address of the Hamilton Combination Poorhouse and when people were admitted it was usually a last resort, my great grandfather also died at the Hamilton Poorhouse.
Seagrave1
Before William was admitted to the poorhouse, he was living with his daughter Margaret at 34 King Street, Burnbank, Hamilton. This house still stands to this day and hasn’t changed much since 1948. Your great grandfathers’ parents were called Edward Seagrave who was a General Laborer & Anne McDermott.
 
Your great grandmother Ellen Hall had passed away before 1948, so I then went looking for her death certificate and I found that Ellen died ten years earlier on the thirteenth of September 1938. She died at 34 King Street and her son A. Seagrave was the person who registered her death. Ellen’s parents were called Andrew who was a Tailor Journeyman & Mary Boyle.
Seagrave2
 
William & Ellen married in Glaslough, Monaghan in Ireland on the 14th of August 1901. Their daughter Margaret was then born on the 28th of October 1915 at 7 Greenfield ‘New’ Rows. This house would have come with William’s job as a coal miner.
 
When I looked at the 1911 census, I found that both William & Ellen were born in Ireland and perhaps this is why they married in Monaghan, it could have either been where both lived before coming to Hamilton, or at lease where Ellen lived as traditionally the bride gets married in her home town.
Seagrave3
 
On this census the information tells us that up until this point there was 6 children born and that two had died. The 1911 census also gives us an insight to their travel. A daughter Mary was born in Burnbank, Hamilton in 1903, their son James was born in Ireland in 1905 & Bridget was born in Burnbank, Hamilton only a month earlier.
Seagrave4
 
Celeste, you had mentioned that you found Ellen on the 1871 census living in Glasgow. I have found no evidence of her being alive in this year! The 1911 census has her age as 19, however, I believe that this has been a mistake and it should have been recorded as 29. Also, on her death cert her age is 58 making her birth year c1880.
 
The reason why William & Ellen moved to Hamilton is unclear, but I suspect that they moved here not long after getting married. It is more than likely that they moved to Hamilton for William to gain work at Greenfield Colliery where many men from Ireland worked. I also have to add that during my years of research, there have been many families move from Monaghan to Hamilton for work at one of the coal mines, so perhaps William knew someone from his village who already worked here?
 
Celeste, I’m sorry that I can’t give you the answers that you are looking for, but please do let us know about your trip when you come over to visit us in the summer and as I mentioned at the start of this post, there are still members of the Seagrave family who live in Hamilton and perhaps one of them might get in touch.
 
Garry,

Philips Factory.

 

As Philips Factory has now closed and soon there will be houses built on its land, we thought that we would share our pictures of the factory.

Harry Govers, who has been a long serving employee for many years has been kind enough to donate the old pictures of Philips Factory to Historic Hamilton which we will digitise and preserve for future generations to see.

The first batch of pictures that we have published shows some former employees of the once large factory which stretched across Wellhall Road.

Unfortunately, we don’t have the names of the people in the pictures, but perhaps you can help us put some names to faces?

I would like to thank Harry for kindly donating the Philips Factory pictures to Historic Hamilton and in the coming weeks, we will add the rest of Harry’s pictures to our website.

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE.

Historic-Hamilton_christmas-logo.png

Hi folks,

From my house to yours, I hope that you all have a wonderful Christmas and enjoy time with your family.

Please remember if you are visiting some older relatives talk about the old times and if you can try and get some pictures for me so that I can share with everyone on my website, which is viewed in many countries around the world.

Merry Christmas,
Garry McCallum,