The Troc

Troc.

The Troc!
 
“”The Trocadero” Hamilton,the greatest place to go,
Music, dancing, happiness, friends you got to know,
 
Big band night, for older “kids” run by big Dave Muir!
We loved all the groups, n’the best wee Chris McLure.
 
You were told about this place, n’went with trepidations,
But once you entered, it fulfilled all of your expectations,
 
Young men n’women, dressed to kill, realy lookin” great,
Lookin’ around for a while, to go dance you couldn’t wait.
 
The girls danced together, round handbags on the floor”
The sound of music all around, you couldn’t ask for more,
 
The lads at the side, keeping watch, “which girl should i ask”
We all had to pick our moment, it was a real daunting task,
 
The women took no prisoners, a nod, or you seen thier back
When the ‘spotlight’ came on, now that was a different crack,
 
Lot’s of lovely girls, but the boys were really far outnumbered
A magical night was had by all, and especially if you lumbered””
 
The above poem was written for Historic Hamilton By Hugh Hainey.

The county Buildings.

 

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The county Buildings.

The Council Headquarters building, on Almada Street, Hamilton, was built as the Lanark County Buildings in 1963, and designed by Lanark council architect D G Bannerman.

The 16 storey, 165 foot tower is the largest in Hamilton, and is a highly visible landmark across this part of the Clyde Valley. The modernist design was influenced by the United Nations building in New York.

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Glass curtain walls cover the north and south facades, with the narrow east and west sides being blank white walls. At the front of the building is the circular council chamber, and a plaza with water features. It is known by the Hamilton people as the “County Buildings”.

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The building today is still Hamilton’s best known landmark and in previous years people have used the fountain at the front to cool down in hot summers and there have also been brave people abseiling down the side of the building to raise money for charity.

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I have never been in the county buildings, but maybe someone who works in one of the top offices could get a picture for us all to see the remarkable views over Hamilton.

Walter McGowan dies, aged 73.

Walter-McGowan

The Hamilton fighter won Scottish, British, European and Empire titles before defeating Italy’s Salvatore Burruni at Wembley over 15 rounds to land the world flyweight title in 1966.

Walter McGowan.

In McGowan’s next fight, he won the British and Empire title at bantamweight when he defeated Alan Rudkin, again at Wembley.

He won 32 of his 40 professional fights before retiring in 1969.

McGowan had been in poor health in recent years and was living in a nursing home in Bellshill.

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He died peacefully at Monklands Hospital on Monday night.

One of 10 children, McGowan is survived by a son and daughter and a grandson and grand-daughter.

Our thoughts go out to his family.

The Eddlewood Gala Day 1985.

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Angela MacSkimming Gala Queen 1985.

In the picture is Andrea MacSkimming as the gala queen 1985. With. Left is andrea and right is jane. As the maids of honour, Picture courtesy of Johnny MacSkimming.

What was your memories of the Eddlewood Gala Day? Do you have any pictures that you would like to share?

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Andrea MacSkimming as the gala queen 1985. With. Left is andrea and right is jane. As the maids of honour.

Best years of my life.

John Mills.
John Mills & his two younger brothers.
John Mills sent us a picture of him and his two younger brothers, John Wrote:
 
“I’ve unearthed another image. Again Me and my two younger brothers. I reckon it was taken in 1960. Its at the bottom of the garden at 143 Meikle Earnock Rd. Looking down toward Neilsland Pl and Fairhill Pl? There were playing fields and a football pitch down there.”
 
Can you remember the playing fields at Fairhill Place?

 

The Hamilton Hippodrome.

Hippodrome.

The Hamilton Hippodrome was situated in Townhead Street. The picture above is advertising a run of the film ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’.

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It opened it’s doors on the 14th of  October 1907 by E.H. Bostock, to the cost of of nearly £5,000.  It was situated at 90 Townhead Street, just at the junction with Low Patrick Street. The building was similar to his Paisley Hippodrome, which in turn was based on the huge Scottish Zoo & Glasgow Hippodrome in Cowcaddens. The building was designed by Bertie Crewe  and it was based on ideas created by E. H. Bostock.

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E.H. Bostock.

The building was a large wooden auditorium.It created  space for circus entertainment and for variety shows, and pantomime. There were stalls which could be reduced to make way for a circus ring, circle & balcony. Films were also added if time permitted!

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Programme for the Hippodrome.

Harry McKelvie who often did pantomimes at the Royal Princess’s theatre in Glasgow also did his shows here at the Hippodrome, the admission prices were: boxes 11/6d, single 2/4d, stalls 1/3d, pit 8d. In the 1930s Harry Gordon, Dave Willis and Tommy Morgan were great favourites and also often did shows here in Hamilton.

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Advert in the Hamilton Advertiser 27 February 1915.

It was reported in the Hamilton Advertiser in December 1914 “As it was the festive season the Hamilton Hippodrome were running the Panto ‘Goodie Two Shoes’ starring some local ‘mirth provokers’ and the wounded Belgians soldiers housed in the area were taken to the cinema by the Provost’s wife, Mrs Moffat.”

The Hippodrome was Sold to Winocour’s, 1941. and ran up until 1946 when sadly the building was destroyed by fire.

 

 

Fairhill Crescent

 

Ian Cochran sent Historic Hamilton pictures of his younger years when he was a wee boy living in Fairhill. The pictures were taken in Fairhill Crescent at the corner of Mill Road in the late 50s.

Ian told us:

“I came from a family of 13 i had 8 sisters 2 brothers and myself and maw and da my family were well known in Hamilton all my brothers uncles da grandfather all were killers they worked in The Abattoirs or known as slaughter hoose my Father Jimmy Cochran worked in slaughter houses all over Scotland our nickname was cokey short for Cochran some spelt in cocky”.

Looking behind Ian in the second picture you can see the well healed man, possibly going out in to the town for the night, I also love the wooden fences in the background, they are still to this day in a lot of gardens in Hamilton.

If you would like to share your old photos, then please send them to us on a PM or by email to: historichamilton@icloud.com

 

 

Child accidentally Strangled in Church Street 1914.

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Sarah’s Death Cert.

 

When reading through old news paper articles, you sometimes come across some sad stories and none was sadder than the story of a poor wee girl called Sarah McFarlane who died when she was out playing in the back court of her house.

The Daily Record reported the story on the 4th February 1914 and it read:

“The Hamilton police report a distressing fatality in a back court in Church Street. A rope stretched from a lamp post to a telephone pole is made use of by the tenants as a clothes line. At one end of the line a loop hangs down, and the children have been in the habit of fixing this loop round their waist and swinging on it.

Sarah McFarlane (3), daughter of a miner appears to have attempted to imitate her elder playmates, with the result that the rope slipped upwards and caught her round her neck. Before assistance could reach her death had ensued from strangulation.”

Sarah was the daughter of James & Sarah McFarlane James was from Cambuslang and Sarah from East Kilbride. They had only been married 8 years, they had two other children called James & Mary-Ann. The family like most could have come to Hamilton so that James could gain employment at one of the mines.

The family lived at 39 Church Street, the accident could probably have happened at the back court of number 39 and as you can imagine, this would haunt Sarah McFarlane every time she had to go outside to dry her washing.

I had a look at the 1915 valuation roll and the family were still living at 39 church street! I have left the research at this point as there still may be some descendants of James & Sarah McFarlane living in the town.

PHILLIPS FACTORY GOLF OUTING C1956.

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Terry Bouette sent us a picture of the a golf outing for the workers of Phillip’s factory. Terry wrote:

“This is a photo of a Phillips Factory Golf Outing at Moffit golf course. Unable to give date but probable between 1954 -1960. I am in third row third from right immediately in front of me in white jacket is I believe Robert Gilmour. Eric Forlow is 4 rows from front and four from left. In second row three from left is Jim Russell that may be Eric Caldow third row on right? I am not sure if that is Harry Price on front row these golf outings were a yearly outing always at Moffit it would be interesting if anyone can identify others.”

Can you help with the rest of the names in the picture? Let us know and tell us about your memories of Phillips.