HAMILTON WOMAN JUST MISSES HER CENTENARY.

HAMILTON WOMAN JUST MISSES HER CENTENARY.
Isabella Brown News paper report.
 
Mrs Brown of 6 Almada Street, who passed away in 1927, missed her 100th birthday by four months. “Granny” Brown’s chief desire for some years prior to her death was that she should see her hundredth birthday, and after enjoying good health up to a week or two ago she took a sudden illness which ultimately thwarted her ambition.
 
Mrs Brown could recall the days when as a girl, she had to tramp from Lesmahagow to Hamilton a distance of fully ten miles for her messages, whilst she had vivid recollections of the old stagecoach days in Lanarkshire.
 
In 1927, living to the ripe old age of 100 was not something that most people would ever see and after I uncovered this little snippet in the Sunday Post, I decided to find out who Mrs Brown was.
 
Mrs Brown was born on the 20th of August 1827 at Lesmahagow to parents William Paton & Catherine Watson and her dad was a ploughman. She was baptised on the 16th of September in the same year.
 
She married Robert Brown on the 2nd of December 1849 at Lanark. Robert was a Journeyman joiner and he was born at Rosebank in the year 1828 and I decided to follow her through the census records to follow her journey.
 
1861, she was living at Netherhouse, Lesmahagow living with her husband and kids, Catherine John Isabella & Thomas. On this census, she tells the enumerator that even though married, she wants to be known as Isabella Paton.
 
When we move on ten years later, she is still living at Netherton with her husband and kids. Her husband now is working on a farm and they would have either been living on the farm or nearby. In 1881 this is the last time that we find her on a census, where she is still living at Netherhouse.
Isabella Paton death.
When I looked what became of Isabella’s children, I found that they moved away in far places, including different countries. Isabella will have descendants now living all over the world which includes her son Thomas who saw out his days in Clarion, Pennsylvania, USA. Her daughter Mary Ann Brown, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Her son William, Worthington, England. Each of her children had a large family of their own with many grandchildren.
 
It is unclear when Isabella moved to Hamilton, or why, but she saw out her last days living at 6 Almada Street. What a life she had living very close to her centenary.
 
If you think that you mat be related to Isabella Brown, then please get in touch.
6 Almada Street.

Dressed to impress.

Elizabeth Turney2

Elizabeth Turney sent us this picture of her mother Elizabeth Lang. The picture is taken on Quarry Street on what looks like a nice sunny day.

Elizabeth told us, my mother on the right hand side, with sister in law and niece. The guy on the left is her first husband Frank or Francis Wilson, Professional footballer.

Do you have any old family pictures that you would like to share? Send them to us and we will host them on our website for all to see.

Can you identify the school in this picture?

Elizabeth Turney1

In this picture we have Elizabeth Young Campbell Lang who was boron on the 26th of December 1909. She is second row, second from the right.

She was the only daughter of Elizabeth Campbell and John Lang, Blacksmith. They also had sons William, John, James, George, Gilbert and David.

The picture was sent to me by Elizabeth Turney, who is the daughter of little Elizabeth in the picture.

We would like it if the school can be identified, does the staircase and window look familiar? If it does, then please get in touch.

MALCOLM STEWART 1823-1893.

MALCOLM STEWART 1823-1893.
Malcolm Stewart Death Card.
 
Janalee Bachand recently inherited a box of letters which included her 3-x great grandfather’s funeral notice card and she decided to get in touch with Historic Hamilton. Apart from what she has in the box she knows very little about her ancestry, so I decided to have a look for her. Janalee, here’s what I found.
 
I started my research with Malcolm and found that he was born on the 12th of January 1823 at Old Monklands which is now called Coatbridge. His parents were called Gilbert Stewart & Mary Johnston. He was baptised seven days after his birth on the 19th of January 1823, also at Old Monklands.
The first document that I find is on the 1841 census where Malcolm is living at a place called Chapelhall which used to be part of the Bothwell parish, now in North Lanarkshire. He was living with his parents and siblings. He is working as a coal miner at the age of 15.
 
He married your 3-x great grandmother on the 4th of January 1846 at Bothwell and her name was Margaret Stevenson Thomson. Margaret was the daughter of Robert Thomson & Jean Napier.
 
Malcolm & Margaret next appear on the 1851 census where they are living on Bo’Ness Road at Chapelhall and he is still working as a coal miner. Now I have to say that working as a coal miner was not a very well-paid job and most men who worked down in the pits struggled to feed their families.
The coal mines were very dangerous, and men & boys were often killed while at work, so I found it surprising when I next looked at the 1861 census and found that Malcolm had managed to change career and was now working as a butcher.
 
Within ten years, he had worked his way out of poverty and now had this fantastic job that would have allowed him to properly feed his family, in fact, he had quite a large family which I will tell you about soon. I have also never come across a man who has worked his way from being a coal miner and is now a pillar of the community which everyone would have known, so this for me is quite unusual.
 
So, Malcolm & Margaret had 13 children between them who were named:
Jane, 1846-1872. Gilbert, 1849-1938. Robert, 1850-1891. Mary, 1852-1883. Alexander, 1854-1883. Margaret, 1856-1931. Malcolm, 1858-1890. John, 1861-1942. David, 1863-1945. William, 1865-1954. Elizabeth, 1969-1941. Jane, 1873 & Malcolm 1877. Sadly, Malcolm & Margaret outlived five of their kids.
 
In 1881 the family were living at Docherty’s Buildings on Low Blantyre Road where he was now retired. The family then moved down to Burnbank and in 1891 they lived at Enfield Place; this block of tenements was part of the old Burnbank Cross.
 
When Malcolm retired, his sons took over the family business and staying in 1891 Robert was in charge of the shop and his brothers Gilbert, John, William & Malcolm were his assistants. I would imagine that the shop was doing pretty well to be employing so many of the family.
Malcolm Stewart Death
 
So, as you know Malcolm died on the 8th of March 1893. He died of a stroke and his son Gilbert registered his father’s death and took care of the funeral arrangements.
 
Janalee, your funeral card indicates that your 3-X Great grandfather was buried at the Holytown Churchyard. This is quite far out from Burnbank where he lived in his later years and I can’t give you an answer as to why he was buried here but it is very possible that his dad, Your 4-X Great Grandfather is buried at the churchyard. Perhaps there was a family plot here, or as this was where he lived in his younger years, then he may have felt that this place was home for him.
 
Janalee, if you do decide to research your family history, then let me know if you come across any pictures of your family and thanks for getting in touch with me at Historic Hamilton.
 
Garry,