Lost houses of Hamilton.

The Ranche holiday club 23rd July 1927.

The Ranch holiday club. WM. Picture courtesy of Cat Ann Burns.

One thing that I often find hard is for people to look out their old photographs to share on Historic Hamilton. There must be thousands of pictures all across the world tucked away in albums, drawers up the loft etc.

Cat Ann Burns has sent us this real snap shot in time and in the picture are Hamilton men who were the local clientele in 1927.

The lads must have been saving for this holiday for a long time as they took time to make a plaque and pose for this picture. They are all extremely well dressed in their suits and dressed to impress.

Do you have any old pictures that you can share with us? if you can, then please send your picture to the page or by email at: HistoricHamilton@icloud.com

The Seagrave family.

The Seagrave family.
Celeste Landeros contacted us to see if we could assist with her family research. Celeste said:
 
“Hello Garry, I’m so excited to find your FB and website, historic Hamilton. I am planning a family heritage trip to Scotland this summer and have been researching our family’s past in preparation. My grandmother, Bridget “Betty” Seagrave was born in Burnbank in 1911 and immigrated to Scotland by herself in 1929.
 
We have very little information about her father, William C. Seagrave and her mother, Ellen Hall. There is a William Seagrave, age 25, in the 1901 census, living with the London family in the Albert Buildings. He is listed as a “pit worker,” presumably with Earnock. After that nothing. My grandmother’s marriage registry lists her father as having been born in Armah, Ireland.
 
My great grandmother, Ellen Hall, was born in Glasgow and the 1871 census lists her as living with her parents, both from Armah, on the notorious Muse Lane, that was “cleared” around that time. Her parents immigrated to Philadelphia but appear to have left her behind at age 2. She next shows up in the 1891 voter rolls in Glasgow, living on Whitevale — where I understand there was lodging for young ladies. How did she end up in Burnbank? How long did she live there? How did she meet William Seagrave? When did she pass away?”
 
Celeste, I see from what you have gathered during your research that you have got most of your family documented. The small questions of ‘How’ & ‘Why’ can sometimes never be answered but through extensive research the clues that you stumble across sometimes point you in the right direction to help find your answer. Did you know that today there are still members of the Seagrave family who live in Hamilton and they may be descendants of your great grandfather?
Seagrave
 
I will try to fill in some blanks for you and I started with your great grandfather William C Seagrave. I found that he died 21st of October 1948 and when he died, he was 76 years old. He died at 41 Bothwell Road in Hamilton and this may tell us that the family were not in any kind of financial position to pay for a doctor. 41 Bothwell Road was the address of the Hamilton Combination Poorhouse and when people were admitted it was usually a last resort, my great grandfather also died at the Hamilton Poorhouse.
Seagrave1
Before William was admitted to the poorhouse, he was living with his daughter Margaret at 34 King Street, Burnbank, Hamilton. This house still stands to this day and hasn’t changed much since 1948. Your great grandfathers’ parents were called Edward Seagrave who was a General Laborer & Anne McDermott.
 
Your great grandmother Ellen Hall had passed away before 1948, so I then went looking for her death certificate and I found that Ellen died ten years earlier on the thirteenth of September 1938. She died at 34 King Street and her son A. Seagrave was the person who registered her death. Ellen’s parents were called Andrew who was a Tailor Journeyman & Mary Boyle.
Seagrave2
 
William & Ellen married in Glaslough, Monaghan in Ireland on the 14th of August 1901. Their daughter Margaret was then born on the 28th of October 1915 at 7 Greenfield ‘New’ Rows. This house would have come with William’s job as a coal miner.
 
When I looked at the 1911 census, I found that both William & Ellen were born in Ireland and perhaps this is why they married in Monaghan, it could have either been where both lived before coming to Hamilton, or at lease where Ellen lived as traditionally the bride gets married in her home town.
Seagrave3
 
On this census the information tells us that up until this point there was 6 children born and that two had died. The 1911 census also gives us an insight to their travel. A daughter Mary was born in Burnbank, Hamilton in 1903, their son James was born in Ireland in 1905 & Bridget was born in Burnbank, Hamilton only a month earlier.
Seagrave4
 
Celeste, you had mentioned that you found Ellen on the 1871 census living in Glasgow. I have found no evidence of her being alive in this year! The 1911 census has her age as 19, however, I believe that this has been a mistake and it should have been recorded as 29. Also, on her death cert her age is 58 making her birth year c1880.
 
The reason why William & Ellen moved to Hamilton is unclear, but I suspect that they moved here not long after getting married. It is more than likely that they moved to Hamilton for William to gain work at Greenfield Colliery where many men from Ireland worked. I also have to add that during my years of research, there have been many families move from Monaghan to Hamilton for work at one of the coal mines, so perhaps William knew someone from his village who already worked here?
 
Celeste, I’m sorry that I can’t give you the answers that you are looking for, but please do let us know about your trip when you come over to visit us in the summer and as I mentioned at the start of this post, there are still members of the Seagrave family who live in Hamilton and perhaps one of them might get in touch.
 
Garry,

Philips Factory.

 

As Philips Factory has now closed and soon there will be houses built on its land, we thought that we would share our pictures of the factory.

Harry Govers, who has been a long serving employee for many years has been kind enough to donate the old pictures of Philips Factory to Historic Hamilton which we will digitise and preserve for future generations to see.

The first batch of pictures that we have published shows some former employees of the once large factory which stretched across Wellhall Road.

Unfortunately, we don’t have the names of the people in the pictures, but perhaps you can help us put some names to faces?

I would like to thank Harry for kindly donating the Philips Factory pictures to Historic Hamilton and in the coming weeks, we will add the rest of Harry’s pictures to our website.

MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE.

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Hi folks,

From my house to yours, I hope that you all have a wonderful Christmas and enjoy time with your family.

Please remember if you are visiting some older relatives talk about the old times and if you can try and get some pictures for me so that I can share with everyone on my website, which is viewed in many countries around the world.

Merry Christmas,
Garry McCallum,

Can you help identify “Mrs Nicholson” and “Mrs Black”?

 

Mrs Nicholson and Mrs Black, Courtesy of Miss MTL Watson.PNG

HI Folks, We’re looking for some help to identify the street in this picture. Donald Cochrane sent us this picture and told us:

“These two photos taken in Hamilton on the 10th October 1957 are of “Mrs Nicholson” and “Mrs Black” I see the house number is 144. Can anyone identify what street this is and perhaps even know of these people? The image may show three generations. One lady was apparently “a sister of Mr Kirkness” but that’s all I know. Photo credit Miss MTL Watson”

Donald, after i put out the post on my Facebook page, the house was identified as 144 Strathaven Road and when i did some comparisons with Google Maps, I then confirmed that this was indeed 144 Strathaven Road, i did a quick search on the valuation rolls and found no surnames that matched with the house. The closest that i could get to this date was on the 1940 Valuation Roll where i found a Mrs Brown living here. I then looked at deaths in Hamilton between 1957 & 1980 and a few leads popped up. Unfortunately 1957 is a hard date to research and I will have to rely on my readers to help me narrow down the search, could you tell me the first name of the elderly lady on the left?

If any of our readers recognise the ladies in the picture, then please get in touch.

THE HAMILTON ADVERTISER IS LEAVING HAMILTON.

We no longer have a newspaper being written in out town after 163 years of reporting the local news.
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I enjoy reading my local newspaper, my local newspaper tells me what happens in Hamilton and tells me about local community events and it even does little things that gives a newspaper a personal touch such as ‘Reader of the week’ & sections such as ‘You said it’.
 
On Friday when I got home from work after a long hard week and as I do every Friday, I sat down at my dining room table to unwind while reading my favourite newspaper and to my surprise I read a small column on page 4 to let the faithful readers of the Hammy Ad know that the newspaper was to leave Hamilton.
 
Some people say to me, what has Hamilton got that makes it a great town? I answer, we have our very own town centre with a fairly good choice of shops, indoor shopping & outdoor, we have a retail park and we have our very own football team. How many people can boast of having a town which is surrounded by forest and county parks and with its very own Racecourse? And I did used to say, we are one of the few towns who has its very own newspaper!
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Now, the Hamilton Advertiser is being taken away from us and will be a Glasgow tabloid. Yes, people will still send things to the newspaper, but for me this is just taking away the ‘Personal Touch’ that our newspaper has always had.
The Hamilton Advertiser was first set up in Hamilton as the Hamilton Herald and was first published in 1856. Back then based in Campbell Street the journalists were embedded within the community and recorded the news every week when it happened. The newspaper would then be written at the Campbell Street news office and even printed on the very same building.
 
Jumping ahead in time when technology changed, and the internet changed the way most of us read our news. The newspaper was still very involved in our community and sent the weekly print by email to the printers, but there has always still been a presence in the community. The reporters were still out in the street and were still part of our community.
 
The newspaper was taken over by Scottish & Universal Newspapers LTD many years ago, but yes, it still ran as our town’s local newspaper and even though the newspaper had new owners, it was still seen to be “our” local newspaper.
I was the very last customer to purchase something from the Campbell Street newspaper building before it closed and was one of the first to purchase a newspaper from the new premises in Duke Street and now our towns very own newspaper has turned its back on us! The Hamilton Advertiser is now a Glasgow newspaper.
 
I firmly believe that the newspaper owes so much more to us, than a tiny corner printed on the bottom of a page that might go unmissed. Why has the editor not given this week’s edition a centre spread with a couple of pages to say goodbye?
Yes, they can remotely write the news from their Glasgow office, but for myself who has been an avid readier of the Hamilton Advertiser for as long as I can remember, then this is nit good enough!
 
The move from Hamilton will now take the shine away from our ‘Local’ newspaper and with 163 years of reporting History in Hamilton just brushed aside and not even respectfully mentioned to the loyal readers, then this has been a bad choice on behalf of the owners and I would also ask the editor why did the good people of Hamilton not get a say in our historic newspaper being moved away to a different city.