Chatelherault Country Park From Above.

The following video was sent to us by the Clyde & Avon Valley Landscape Partnership and was filmed by Drone Scotland.

Have a look at the stunning view and hidden panoramas revealed at our very own Chatelherault Country Park.

Agnes Scott’s Monument of Memories Part 4 Printed in the Hamilton Advertiser on the 24 June 1966.

Agnesscott.1

In the late twenties, William (or Bill) Anderson, a grandson of the aforementioned Thomas Anderson, became aware of the health-giving benefits derived from physical training and started a course of gymnastics. Others got curious, then interested, so Bill and his cousin William Allan, at present town chamberlain of Campbeltown,  together with John Neilson and Adam Steel, founded Burnblea physical culture club which met nightly in the Anderson home. Unlike the scouts or Boys’ Brigade, where the leaders were older men, this was a club run by youths for youths, and it proved an instant success.

So many young men wanted to join that the founders commenced a search for premises. Mr Sherret, the butcher who had taken over the farm-steading when Bent farm was vacated by Abie Brownlie, let them have the barn for 5 Shillings per night. Aladdin oil lamps were bought to light the place and bales of hay were used as mats. For the sum od sixpence per meeting, members enjoyed every minute of their strenuous exercise and quite a number became proficient weight-lifters. Part of the fun was a dip in the big boilers of cold water.

The barn was not the choicest of premises, however, and with the ever-growing membership a friend suggested that Anderson contact Mr A K Foulis of Hamilton Estates. Bill did this and permission to use the riding school was granted in 1930. This proved an ideal arrangement and the 150 members met for three hours every Tuesday and Friday evening. For the nominal sum of 10 Shillings per month, lighting, heating and bathing facilities were included.

DUKES FANS

The lads were delighted with this generous offer and the Boxing Marquis, the present Duke of Hamilton, became their hero.They were well acquainted with johnnie Brown, who sparred with the Marquis, and they now felt they knew the nobleman too. Later they maintained a lively interest in the Duke’s flying adventures, especially his flight over Everest.

A number of young ladies heard of the success of the club and asked Mr Anderson to form a female group. Bill was hesitant at firs, but when a deputation of girls from Gilchrist’s Bakery approached him he was persuaded and so in 1932, with a membership of 30, Hamilton’s first league of Health and Beauty was formed. Members paid an annual subscription of two shillings, plus sixpence attendance fee. An ante-room in the old Town Hall was rented and the ladies met there once weekly. After a few weeks, larger premises were necessary and the Masonic Hall was rented for one evening a week at 12s 6d per night.

Every kind of training apparatus was purchaser and the membership  rose quickly to 120. Social evenings, dances and hiking expeditions brought the sexes together and both clubs had a continued run of success until they terminated, the physical culture club because of the war and the league of Health and Beauty because of the many other interests of the founders.

One fellow, James Lang still has his membership card which he carries around as a memento of the many happy evenings spent in congenial company. A few have a better reminder for they found romance. Bill Anderson and Adam Steel fall into this group, as they married members of the League of Health and Beauty.

BIG CHANGES

Like most of Hamilton, Burnblea Street is undergoing big changes. Police houses have long since replaced Chassels’ tenement and during 1963-65 burgh houses and a new self service Co-operative licence store were erected on the vacant field and on Nicholson’s site. The other tenements  have been ear marked for early demolition and soon all individuality will have been erased from the street. Instead of the once beautiful stone tenements, one shall find new brick and roughcast dwellings; inferior in my opinion, but for the fact that they contain kitchenettes and bathrooms. A few people, however, are reluctant to move when they compare their present rentals with the high rents of the council houses, for therein  lies a problem far greater than the lack of a bathroom.

DISTRIBUTION OF THE DUCAL BOUNTY.

HamiltonPoor.1
This picture is for illustration purposes only and it is unknown if the children are from Hamilton. 
DISTRIBUTION OF THE DUCAL BOUNTY.
 
His Grace the Duke of Hamilton’s bounty was distributed to the deserving poor of the town; nearly a thousand people sharing in its benefits.
 
As we stated last week, eight of the Cadzow Forrest aboriginal cattle were shot, and by Monday these, in addition to six prime fat oxen, supplied by Mr Meikle, flasher, had been dressed and cut up and elaborate arrangements made of the distribution to the 200 recipients who, about one o’clock, armed with the tickets which had been supplied them beforehand, besieged the entrance gates at Castle Street. At that hour the distribution was commenced, and was carried through in a comparatively brief space of time and in a manner most orderly. Towards this result several members of the Burgh Police who were present, contributed in no small degree.
 
The heads of departments in the office, and others belonging to the ducal establishment, were in attendance, and lent kindly countenances and aid. It should be mentioned that a considerable quantity of meat was sent to rejoice the hearts of the poor people in the Combination Poorhouse. At the distribution each ticket-holder received about 7lbs, and in all 957 cwt. was given away, In addition over 800 loaves were supplied by Mrs Cullen, Messrs Frame, Campbell, Robb, and Gibson, bakers; and the tea and sugar by Messrs Manson & Fletcher, grocers.
 
Through the various clergy of the town 202 cartloads of coal, of 12 cwt. each, were likewise distributed amongst the poor, whose material comfort has thereby been promoted to an incalculable extent. Ref. Hamilton Advertiser. 5/1/1878. Page 2.
 
Historic Hamilton would like to thank Wilma Bolton for Transcribing the article and sending in in to us.

MARQUIS VISITS NEILSLAND COLLIERY.

The_14th_Duke_of_Hamilton_KT,_GCVO,_AFC,_PC,_DL,_FRCSE,_FRGS_by_Stoneman
Douglas Douglas-Hamilton, 14th Duke of Hamilton
The Marquis of Douglas and Clydesdale, with a party including a Russian Princess. Miss Bell, Mr Bell, Mr Eagan the Amateur Champion Boxer of the World; and Johnny Brown Middle-Weight Champion Boxer of Scotland, motored from Dungavel to Neilsland Colliery offices where they were met by Mr. John B. Thomson general manager of John Watson Limited.
 
They then proceeded to the colliery and were introduced to Mr James Cook, manager of Neilsland Colliery, who conducted the party underground, where they spent the day with the miners.
 
They descended No. 1 Pit and visited the machine cut section of the Humph coal and also a hand pick section of the Ell coal.
On their travels the party conversed freely with the different classes of workmen and evinced great interest in the practical part performed by each. They asked numerous questions in order to obtain a thorough grasp of the general conditions underground.
 
The young Marquis, at the coal face, assisted a workman by filling a hutch of coal, which he did in a remarkably short space of time. He thereafter expressed his enjoyment at the work performed and remarked “that a miner was always a man, because his work kept him in a splendid physical condition which explained his success in all classes of sport where strength was required.” Many of the pitmen spoke of the courage by the ladies of the party, as they did not hesitate in going into dusty and contracted corners of the mine and returned to the surface grimy enough to be almost unrecognisable by each other.
 
The party expressed the pleasure they had experienced in meeting personally with the miners at their work and invited a number of them to come up to Dungavel on Saturday, where they would meet with another party of 60 Miners coming from the Bellshill District.
MINERS AT DUNGAVEL :- SPORTS PROGRAME. On Saturday afternoon a party of about 100 miners from Bellshill and Hamilton districts, accompanied by Mr. Joseph Sullivan, M.P. for North Lanark Division, and Mr William B. Small, miners agent, visited Dungavel, where a large house party received them on the terrace in front of the house.
Her Grace welcomed everyone personally. The sports took place on the lawn in front of the terrace and were participated in by all present and greatly enjoyed. Ref. Hamilton Advertiser 25/8/1923. Page 6. Wilma S. Bolton.