Guys Inn

Guys Inn…

Guys Garry & Andy.

 

As some of you will know, I have moved back to Hamilton after being away for 18 years. I went out for a pint with my old pal Andy (Blue T-shirt) and we went to Guys Bar in Meikle Earnock.

This was the first time that I had been in Guys Bar since I was 14 years old and no I wasn’t drinking in it, I used to sell newspapers in the pubs at night and this was where my round started before making it dow it down Low Waters Road and over to Peacock Cross.

For those of you who haven’t managed to sample the fresh lager & cider, I would like to tell you that they serve a great pint. They also sell good food with the restaurant at the back of the pub.

Guys.

Guys Bar is a cosy wee pub with friendly staff and I can see this becoming my new local. So if your passing, why not pop in for a meal or a drink? It’s an old Hamilton pub with a relaxed atmosphere.

Cheers!

Alexander M. Muir

Alexander Muir WM.

In August 1946 Sad news ended an anxious wait for the parents of Alexander M. Muir. Mr & Mrs John Muir of 10 Whitehill Road in Burnbank had known that their son was reported missing following the fall of Singapore, but the sad news came that he had been killed in March 1943.
Gunner Muir joined the Royal Artillery in August 1939 and went overseas in 1941. He was a native of Hamilton he was educated at Greenfield School. He later moved to Rosewell in Midlothian where he gained employment as a machine man in one of the local collieries. 


He was survived by his wife and his six-year-old son. His only brother who was called John served with the 7th Hussars in Libya and was discharged with war wounds in June 1941.
Alexander Muir was another Brave Hamiltonian who gave his life to his King and country.

THE GIRNIN WEAVERS.

Girnin Weaver.

THE GIRNIN WEAVERS.

This quaint old panel was originally embedded in the stonework above the door of the brother Hosie’s bookbinders shop, which once stood on the same site of the former Regal Cinema, Now a carpark on Townhead Street.

The inscription read “The airt of weaving is renowned so, that rich nor poor without it cannot go”

Beneath the inscription are three heads with shuttles in their mouths which probably gave rise to the sobriquet of “The Girnin Weavers”

In November 1946 the old stone panel was housed in the back garden of the house at 40 Auchingrammont Road. In 1946 the house was owned by Mr T. Anderson.

Another interesting antiquity that was stored in the back garden of Mr Anderson in 1946 was a 20 Foot Oak Beam taken from the old Hamilton Grammar School which once stood in Grammar School Square. The old wooden beam was “Ornamented” with the initials and names of the schoolboys bearing the date of 1826.

In May last year, I paid a visit to the house of 40 Auchingrammont Road to see if the stone was still there. The family who lived there were very accommodating and they gave me a tour of their lovely house and garden. Sadly the old stone panel and the old beam are no longer there, so perhaps the said Mr A. Anderson from 1946 had taken these items with him when he moved away.

Do you know where the old stone tablet is? Perhaps it is in your garden or built on to your house as a showpiece? Or do you know the whereabouts of the old wooden beam from the old Grammar school is?

If you do then please let us know, we would like to see this old bit of Hamilton History that once stood in Townhead Street and the old Hamilton Grammar.

GINGER STEWART 1920 – 1990.

Robert Ginger Stewart.

GINGER STEWART 1920 – 1990.

Hamilton has produced some great fighters over the years and one of our best was a lad called Robert Ginger Stewart who was a professional boxer and he was active between 1936 and 1950

He boxed at featherweight; lightweight; welterweight; middleweight and took part in 83 professional contests. Carrying the nickname of a 19th-century boxer, Ginger Stewart fought professionally from 1939 to 1950 and he was the Scottish Area Welterweight Champion from 1939 to 1946.

Robert fought seldom in the wartime years and he had to reclaim his title each time after his absence from the sport, this was probably due to his military service. His career record was 61-13-3, with 26 knockouts delivered and he only received six knock-outs.

Robert was born on the 14th of June 1920 and he was the son of John & Margaret Poulson; his father John was a foundry employee. Robert in his day was a celebrity in Hamilton and he was never out of the newspapers, he loved his boxing, but also loved his time in the army.

He joined the army at the age of 15 and he served his time in the army and made it to the rank of Bombardier and in 1949 he was drafted to Malaya. When he was in Malaya, Robert was in the wrong place at the wrong time! At this moment I do not have the full details of what exactly happened, but he was accused of killing a native of the country.

The incident happened in either at the end of 1950 or the beginning of 1951 where he was accused of shooting a local Malayan girl. The newspaper accounts from 1951 which I have so far come across only seem to cover the story of his mother Margaret, who had to make the long 8,000-mile plane journey to see her son.

Robert’s parents first heard the news of the impending trial when a letter came to their house written by the Rev W. J. Campling who was based at the Roman Catholic Parade in South Malaya.

John and Margaret Stewart were astounded to hear of this terrible news, as Robert had never in his life been in any sort of trouble. The trial was set for the 6th of February 1951 and John’s mother Margaret flew over to be with him.

I have to assume here that Robert was not found guilty of the Murder charge, as he was back home in 1952 where he continued his career as a Boxer. Perhaps someone in Malaya was trying to make him a scapegoat.

At this time I don’t have much more on what became of Robert ‘Ginger’ Stewart after his boxing career ended. I did find some reference that he moved down to Blackpool and became a fruit merchant, but I can’t be certain of this.

I do know that Robert Died 20th October 1990, and I would like to tell the story of this Hamilton fighter whose memory should not be lost in the mist of time. If or when I do find a relative who can tell me more, I will update this story of him.

Do you know what became of Ginger Stewart? If you do, then please let us know and we will share with everyone on Historic Hamilton.

Garry McCallum
Historic Hamilton.

GIANT TO BE DISPLAYED AT THE LOW PARKS MUSEUM.

Hamilton Skeleton.

Last week we heard the news that the Giant of Hamilton will be returning to our town after being on display in Texas for the past 15 years.

The giant skeleton which was uncovered at Brackenhill Farm back in 2003 is to be put on display at the Low Parks Museum this summer and it is expected to attract large numbers of people from all over the UK.

It is thought that the term ‘do you think that you’re a big man’ originates from the finding of the Hamilton Giant.

The Giant of Brackenhill is thought to be a distinct breed of ‘Big Man’ who lived in Hamilton 3,000 years ago! There are still to this day descendants who claim to be ‘A Big Man’ that live in Hamilton, however, this turned out to be just a myth.

What are your thoughts on the Giant Skeleton? Let us know!

JIMMY HAMILT0N.

Jimmy Hamilton

JIMMY HAMILT0N.
 
Jimmy Hamilton needs no introduction on here and people have many fond memories of him. He was very much a part of Hamilton and he was fully integrated into our community.
There is not much that I can tell you about him that you don’t already know, but I will tell you what I do know and hopefully I can keep his memory alive.
 
Jimmy Hamilton had a few nicknames, the better-known one was ‘Steak Pie’ Jimmy and the other ones were safety pin & Castor Oil, the latter name which he absolutely hated.
He was known as Steak Pie Jimmy because of the many funerals which he attended in Hamilton, people said that he only attended funerals because he enjoyed the food at them, but this was not the case! In fact, Jimmy was a real “People Person” and he loved nothing more than to go out in the town and socialise with people and there was no better place to mingle with old friends and acquaintances, but a funeral.
 
He was such a character, that he even brought his own knife and fork, which he carried in his coat pocket. He was also invited to weddings and parties because he was such good fun to be around.
 
It wasn’t uncommon for people from opposite ends of Hamilton to say I bumped into wee Jimmy the day! Jimmy seemed to be everywhere on a daily basis and sometimes he could have been reported sitting drinking tea at lots of cafes in the town within hours of each other.
 
He often went to the Salvation Army and he came to many cafes in Hamilton, where he would put his hand in his pocket and pull out a hand full of coppers to pay for his fags and tea, however, Jimmy’s coppers were often refused, and he was given his tea and fags for free.
 
When he left the cafes, he would go to the Corals the Bookies to have a blether with the staff and when he had been out and about he loved a game of Dominos at the pubs, he couldn’t read or understand the numbers, but he loved the company. In Jimmy’s world, he was descended from the Dukes of Hamilton, but he was the Black sheep of the family and the Duke never spoke to him.
 
He was loved by many people in the town and nowadays I can’t think of anyone who comes close to this Hamilton character. So, let’s keep wee Steak Pie Jimmy’s memory alive and tell us your stories of Jimmy Hamilton.