MILITARY SERVICE REGISTRATION. OVER 3000 MEN REPORT IN LANARKSHIRE.

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MILITARY SERVICE REGISTRATION. OVER 3000 MEN REPORT IN LANARKSHIRE.
 
Scotland provided 26,335 of the quarter-of-a-million men who registered throughout Britain last Saturday under the Military Training Act provisions. The age group, the fourth to register since compulsory military service was introduced comprised the following:
 
(1) men who have reached the age of 20 since December 1, 1939, but before January 1, 1940 (i.e. those born between December 2, 1919, and December 31, 1919, both dated inclusive) and
 
(2) men who have reached the age of 23 since December 31, 1938, but before December 2, 1939, (i.e. those born between January 1, 1916, and December 1, 1916, both dates inclusive.
 
Of the 26,335 registered in Scotland, Lanarkshire provided 3119. Enrolments at the various county Employment Exchanges were as follows (the figures of contentious objectors being given on parenthesis): Uddingston 137 (3) Shotts 254 (4) Cambuslang 235 (12), Motherwell 540 (13), Larkhall 306 (5) Airdrie 329 (12) Hamilton 420 (10), Coatbridge 391 (5), Wishaw 520 (9).
 
The total number of conscientious objectors was 66 or slightly over 2 percent. In the December registration of the 20-22 age group the total registrations were slightly less, 2966, while the conscientious objectors numbered 52, about 1.6 percent.
 
Among those registering last Saturday 453 preferred the Navy, 32 the Marines, and 11 the Navy or Marines, while 130 expressed a preference for Air Flying, 458 for air-ground service and 25 air flying or ground service. The remainder preferred Army service. Ref. Hamilton Advertiser. 24/2/1940. The article was Transcribed by Wilma Bolton and sent to Historic Hamilton.

OLD HAMILTON, FURTHERING THE SCHEME OF DEMOLITION. AN OUT-DATED FUE DISPOSITION.

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The following story was printed in The Hamilton Advertiser on the 21/1/1933 and was transcribed by Wilma Bolton.
 
Another old landmark in the town is fated to disappear within the next few days. A start had been made with the demolition of that angle of building behind the Public Library long known as Fore Row and Back Row.
 
For nearly 150 years these two rows of houses have been a conspicuous object, overlooking the Common Green from their loft perch, and as seen from Cadzow Bridge in these latter days, contrasting unfavourable with those palatial villas which adorn the slightly higher reaches of Cadzow Burn.
 
The fues for these houses now being removed were given off round about 1782. The superior was then John Campbell, of Saffronhall, Hamilton and some half- a-dozen pieces of ground were separately feud. In the fue disposition then granted in favour of the various feurs the ground is disponed with the liberty and privilege “of passing upon foot by the front of the said houses through a part of my said other ground to and from the Burn of Hamilton for water according as I shall lay off a road for the purpose, said passage to be shut up upon Sundays, and an hour after sunset every other day.”
 
Cadzow Burn was then a stream of some considerable utility in the town recourse being had to it not only for washing purposes but for domestic supply of drinking water. When the Fore and Back Rows were built, the site would be well on the outskirts of the town, and as dwellings, they housed in some instances citizens of status and substance.
 
In the Fore Row are three very characteristic Scottish houses with their steep roofs, stone skews and circular moulded club skews. But the house at the corner of Muir Street is particularly interesting. Architecturally it is an interesting little gem, with its projecting quoins, rusticated arched doorway, well-proportioned windows, stone cornice, Scottish dormer windows and stone ridge. The front wall has been cemented at some later date, but, in its original state when the stonework was exposed it must have been a very attractive and imposing front.
 
There is no date on but it appears to have been erected in the early eighteenth century. The design is not unlike the Parish Church which may indeed have provided the builder with some inspiration.
 
Latterly these 150 years old dwellings were adjudged to be wretched hovels, only fit for removal. A new block of Corporation houses is to be built on the site and the Dean of Guild as already approved of the plans.
 
Considerable improvement will be affected in Church Street by the demolition of the range of former dwellings between the two common lodging houses there—Greenside and Hamilton Home. Plans have been prepared for a new lot of houses on this site consisting of a block facing the street, and a hostel at the back overlooking the Common Green.
 
This will almost complete the very substantial scheme of improvement which wiped out the New Wynd, and which transformed Grammar School Square, Back o’ Barns and the Postgate.
 
Thus steadily is old Hamilton falling a victim to the modern conceptions of public health and housing.
 

RIVET-MAKER AND THE ” DOLE.”

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On Saturday the 15th of April 1922 a charge of defrauding the Labour Exchange was preferred against James Todd, a rivet-maker, residing Greenfield Rows, Hamilton.
 
The Fiscal explained that the offence here was that the accused had concealed from the authorities at the Labour Exchange the fact that for two days had been working in the rivet works.
 
Accused James Todd told the Judge “I was under the belief that could work and make 20s a week without interfering with my right to the dole.”
 
Sheriff Stodart told Todd, I see no reason of a sentence £3, or twenty days’ imprisonment.
 
It is unknown to me what option James Todd had taken.
 
I wonder if this kind of punishment would deter able-working people from signing on in modern day Hamilton!

The Dowds & Monaghan Family of Eddlewood Rows.

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The Dowds & Monaghan Family of Eddlewood Rows.

Peter Dowds sent us this fantastic picture of children from the 1930s, who lived at Eddlewood Rows and asked Historic Hamilton to look at the family history of his grandparents.

Here is what we found:

In the middle of the photo is Peter’s auntie, Bridget Monaghan with her
arms around Peters mother Mary Monaghan. Peter told Historic Hamilton that he doesn’t know who the other children in the picture are.

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Peters mum Mary was born in 1920 and his auntie Bridget was born on the 23 July 1913, in the family home of 22 Eddlewood Rows at 5:00 am. Peter’s grandparents on his mum’s side were Thomas Monaghan & Nora Meaghan from Belmullet, Co, Mayo in Ireland and were married on the 8th February 1907, in their home town of Belmullet.

They emigrated to Scotland just after they were married and shortly after their first child Thomas, was born. Thomas, who was Peters uncle, was born on the 26th May 1908, at 11 Brown Street in Hamilton. Thomas’ father had gained employment and was working doing odd jobs as a general labourer. Peters auntie Sabina was born in 1910 also at the family home of 11 Brown Street.

Bridget & Mary (who are in the group picture) were 2 of 6 children. All the family & relatives settled in Eddlewood, Meikle Earnock and Quarter Road. Peter spent his younger years in Hamilton and he used to work for McKeon’s the “bookies”, he worked in Castle Street, Almada Street, Cadzow Street and in Paisley shops. He later joined the Lanarkshire Police and was posted to Baillieston.

He then moved to England for a few years and eventually left England and emigrated to Hong Kong where he joined Royal Hong Kong Police. After 9 years’ service, Peter emigrated once again, this time over to New Zealand and became a citizen of New Zealand on the 16th December 1974 where he now has settled with his family.

Going back to Hamilton, the houses in Eddlewood Rows consisted of two rooms with 2-bed recesses in each room which had drawers under them for storage. There was a coal range in one room and a fireplace in the other. The toilet was in the entrance way before the entry to the main part of the house. There was a copper and mangle in the communal wash house with communal clothes lines facilities. If you were the right height as a kid and you were running or walking in this area at night you were liable to get choked or nearly decapitated if someone had forgotten to take down their clothes line, Eddlewood Rows as all mining communities in the 1930s weren’t very well lit up at night! There was also a communal “midden” in the same area.

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Some of the family surnames that lived at Eddlewood in the 1930s are listed below, they would have more than likely been the parents of the children in this picture.

John Marshall, Robert McCrum, John Henry, James Haughim? Thomas Martin, James McInnes, Alexander Crookston, John Lindsay, Robert Rodger, Harry Gray, Archibald Craig, John Cadenhead, Archibald Kerr, James Addis, William McDowall, William Wilkie, Joseph Addis, Thomas Monaghan (Peters relative), Allan Wilkie, James O’Donnell, Robert Patterson, James Wilkie, Daniel McCarthy, Edward McKenna, William Maxwell, John Riddell, John O’Neill, Alexander Hodge, Michael Fowler, John Neill.

I asked Peter what he could tell me about his dad’s side of the family and Peter told us that the family were Dowd’s and lived in the road that run down the side of the old gasworks in Hamilton, he told me that they were the gas works on the left coming down from Eddlewood.

I did a bit of digging and I found that Peter’s dad (who was called John) was born in Glasgow and married his mum Mary on the 26th of October 1940 at St. Anne’s Chapel in Hamilton. At the time they married, Peter’s dad was living at 4 Burnside Lane across from the Gasworks, his mum was living at 62 Eddlewood Rows with her parents.

Peter also didn’t know his grandmother, as she had passed away when he was very young, however, I managed to find her. Peter, your grandmother died when you were 5 years old on the 7th of August 1948 at her house in 4 Burnside Lane. She died at 11:00 am and the cause of death was Myocardial Degeneration (Heart Disease). Your uncle James was the informant of her death. A strange coincidence, but at the time your uncle James was living at 15 Farm Terrace in Burnbank, my own grandparents lived at 17 Farm Terrace and may have possibly known your uncle James as they would have been neighbours.

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On his dad’s side, Peters grandparents were Peter Dowds & Cecilia McAtasney and his grandfather Peter was a Coal Hewer. In 1940, they were living at 4 Burnside Lane. His grandparents were a family from Maryhill in Glasgow and were married on the 18th of July 1908 at Maryhill. When they married, his grandfather was living at 46 Kelvin Street and his grandmother was living at 8 Park Place, she was a Paper Mill Worker in Glasgow.

When I looked back further I found that Peter’s great grandparents on his dad’s side, were John Dowds (also a Coal Miner who had died before 1908) and Elizabeth Donnelly. On his gran’s side, his great grandparents were called James McAtasney (a General Labourer) and Mary McGowan.

I also managed to track down another family member for Peter, I found a Helen Fitzpatrick Armstrong and I asked who she was, Peter told us: “My Uncle Peter Dowds married a lady called Helen Armstrong. After he died she sort of vanished from our lives. If it was the same person then she would have been a “good” age.”

Peter, I have found that your auntie Helen Armstrong died in Dunoon in 2008 aged 81. She was born in 1927. This connection has reference to Dowds & Fitzpatrick but as her death certificate will have to be ordered I can’t give you the full details. This Helen was also Born in Hamilton.

We would like to thank Peter for sending us his old family photos.

Do you have an old photo or want to find out what happened to a family member? Send us your pictures and requests and we will look into this for you.

Blackswell Street May 1997 to the A723 in September 2016.

Blackswell Street Lucy MacKinnon.Blackswell Street.

Same Street, 20 years apart, In 1997 the picture to the left was Blackswell Street and a One Way and the picture to the right is the same place but now a Dual Carriage Way.
 
If you had not been in Hamilton since 1997 and you come back today, you will no longer see the old buildings of the past. Today we have the Holiday Inn Where the Car sales room was located along with a car park and the old Regal is also now a car park.
 
There is also now new apartments where the Old budget Tyre & Exhaust place once stood.
 
Picture courtesy of Lucy MacKinnon.

THE OLD REGAL 1997.

Old Regal Cinema 1997 Lucy MacKinnon.

May 1997 and here we have one of the last pictures of the Old Regal. This picture was taken from the ramp at Primark and it also shows the closed down shops that used to be in frequent use to the public. Picture courtesy of Lucy MacKinnon.

If you have an old picture that you would like to share, then we would like to see it. Send your pictures to us straight on the Facebook Page, or by email, Just click the email button at the top of the page.

15 YEARS MARRIED TODAY.

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15 YEARS MARRIED TODAY.

Today is my wedding anniversary!

I would like to wish my beautiful wife Emma, a happy anniversary and here is to the next fifteen years!

My wife and I met at the Hamilton Palace in August 1999 and we got married in a small church at Dolphinton at the edge of the Scottish Borders in 2002.

We had our wedding reception at the Tinto Hotel in Symington and had our honeymoon in Cancun Mexico. We have got three boys Daniel, Ryan and Caiden. Fifteen years married and our wedding day still feels like yesterday.

Do you share your wedding anniversary with us? If you do, then send us your wedding picture and we will post it on Historic Hamilton for all to see.

HAMILTON FOLK.

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I am always looking to add pictures of people from Hamilton to this folder and I thought it was about time that I added a picture of myself & my wife Emma.

For those of you that don’t know me, my name is Garry McCallum and I am originally from Burbank, I run Historic Hamilton and am responsible for all the stories that you hopefully enjoy reading.

As Historic Hamilton is nearly two years old I thought it would be good to put a face to the name that you see and read about.

If you would like to add someone to the “Hamilton Folk” album, then please feel free to send us your pictures and we will share with everyone in the group.

Garry

THE LAST MILK RUN BY HORSE & CART IN HAMILTON.

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THE LAST MILK RUN BY HORSE & CART IN HAMILTON.
This picture tells a story of long tradition that has sadly gone. In the 1960s and for generations before the people in the picture, deliveries were done by Horse & Cart.
 
Before the days of the milk van, you wouldn’t look twice at a horse walking up your street. This picture was taken because it was the very last day of the milk being delivered by horse and cart, and it was this very picture that appeared in the Hamilton Advertiser. The exact date is unknown; however, it is believed to be sometime in the early 1960s. The young man feeding the horse is Tom Little and the woman leaning against the fence is Tom’s mum Jeannie Little.
 
The snapshot was taken outside the house of Tom Little at 17 Linden Lea and it was sent to us by Jane Little, who is Tom’s daughter. Jane told us:
 
“My dad is feeding the horse a treat, while my gran looks on. He didn’t work for the dairy. The dairyman is behind my dad, unfortunately out of sight. This interaction was also filmed and included in a film about “Old Hamilton” that I remember going to see with my mum and gran at the Hamilton Library sometime in the mid- to late-1970s. One of my dad’s younger brothers also appeared in that clip, running from the house to the pavement when the horse pulled up. I don’t have an exact date for the picture, but dad was born in 1947 so I’m thinking this was probably sometime between 1960 and 1963, based on how old he looks. My grandparents were Bill and Jeannie Little who lived at 17 Linden Lea.”
 
Bill & Jeannie raised 5 children, Tom was the oldest. Tom married Martha Courtney in 1965, and the family emigrated to Canada in 1980.
 
We would like to thank Jane for sharing her picture of her dad and the last milk delivery by Horse & Cart in Hamilton.